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PROTRACK » International Results & News » Brussels Diamond League START LISTS - Friday 16th Sept 2011

Brussels Diamond League START LISTS - Friday 16th Sept 2011

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BRUSSELS
DIAMOND LEAGUE
Friday 16th September 2011


Mens 100m
BOLT Usain
CARTER Nesta
CLARKE Lerone
GATLIN Justin
LEWIS-FRANCIS Mark
OUHADI Aziz
PADGETT Travis
VICAUT Jimmy

Mens 200m
ASHMEADE Nickel
ASTRAND Jonathan
BLAKE Yohan
FORSYTHE Mario
SAIDY NDURE Jaysuma
SORRILLO Rondell
WAUGH Ainsley

Mens 400m
BORLÉE Jonathan
BORLÉE Kevin
CLARKE Chris
FOTHERGILL Allodin
GILLET Antoine
HURTAULT Erison
MARCINISZYN Marcin
PISTORIUS Oscar

Mens 800m
AMAN Mohamed
BUBE Andreas
KAKI Abubaker
KIPROP Asbel
KIVUVA Jackson Mumbwa
KSZCZOT Adam
LAALOU Amine
LEWANDOWSKI Marcin
RUDISHA David
SOM Bram
TANGUI Sammy
YEGO Alfred Kirwa

Mens 5000m
ARIKAN Polat Kemboi
BEKELE Tariku
CHEPKOK Vincent Kiprop
CRAGG Alistair Ian
GEBREMESKEL Dejen
KENNOUCHE Abdelslam
LONGOSIWA Thomas Pkemei
MERGA Imane
MUTAHI Sammy Alex
RONO Vincent
ROP Albert

Mens 10000m
BEKELE Kenenisa
BETT Emmanuel Kipkemei
BETT Josphat Kipkoech
BEUGNET Gregory
KIGEN Mike Kipruto
KIPCHOGE Eliud
KIPLIMO Joseph Kitur
KIRUI Peter Cheruiyot
KIRUI Geoffrey
KORIO Alex
LONYANGATA Paul
MASAI Denis
MBISHEI Titus Kipjumba
MOEN Sondre Nordstad
ROTICH Lucas Kimeli
RUPP Galen
TANUI Paul Kipngetich
WATANABE Kazuya

Mens 400m Hurdles
BULTHEEL Michael
CULSON Javier
FLEISCHHAUER Georg
FREDERICKS Cornel
GORDON Jehue
GREENE David
JACKSON Bershawn
PHILLIPS Isa
SÁNCHEZ Félix

Mens Pole Vault
DIDENKOW Mateusz
FILIPPIDIS Konstantinos
GOOSSENS Denis
HOLZDEPPE Raphael
LAVILLENIE Renaud
MESNIL Romain
MICHALSKI Łukasz
MOHR Malte
OTTO Björn
RANS Kevin
STARODUBTSEV Dmitriy

Mens Triple Jump
CLAYE Will
COMPAORÉ Benjamin
COPELLO Alexis
DONATO Fabrizio
EL SHERYF Sheryf
IDOWU Phillips
SANDS Leevan
SCHEMBRI Fabrizio

Mens Shot Put
ARMSTRONG Dylan
CANTWELL Christian
FORTES Marco
HOFFA Reese
LYZHYN Pavel
MAJEWSKI Tomasz
MIKHNEVICH Andrey
WHITING Ryan
Mens Javelin
AVAN Fatih
AVRAMENKO Roman
DE ZORDO Matthias
MAKAROV Sergey
MANNIO Ari
MARTÍNEZ Guillermo
TARABIN Dmitriy
THORKILDSEN Andreas
VASILEVSKIS Vadims
VESELÝ Vítězslav


Womens 100m
BAPTISTE Kelly-Ann
BARBER Mikele
CAMPBELL-BROWN Veronica
FERGUSON-MCKENZIE Debbie
JETER Carmelita
OKAGBARE Blessing
RYEMYEN Mariya
SOLOMON Shalonda

Womens 400m
FIROVA Tatyana
HASTINGS Natasha
KRIVOSHAPKA Antonina
MCCORORY Francena
MONTSHO Amantle
OHURUOGU Christine
WHYTE Rosemarie
WILLIAMS-MILLS Novlene
YEFREMOVA Antonina

Womens 1500m
BELETE Almenesh
BELETE Mimi
DIBABA Genzebe
GEZAHEGNE Kalkidan
HILALI Siham
JAMAL Maryam Yusuf
JEPKOSGEI Janeth
KOSTETSKAYA Yekaterina
LAKHOUAD Ibtissam
MÅKESTAD Ingvill
MARACHEVA Irina
MARTYNOVA Yekaterina
MISHCHENKO Anna
OBIRI Helen
PLIŚ Renata
RODRÍGUEZ Natalia
UCENY Morgan

Womens 3k Steeplechase
ALEMU Birtukan Fente
ARIAS Eva
ASSEFA Sofia
AYALEW Hiwot
BEKELE Mekdes
CHEMOS Milcah
DUARTE Sophie
FUENTES-PILA Zulema
GHRIBI Habiba
KIRUI Purity
KUZMINA Lyudmila
MARTINELLI Giulia
NJOROGE Mercy Wanjiku
ROTICH Lydia Chebet
ZARIPOVA Yuliya

Womens 100m Hurdles
ALI Nia
CARRUTHERS Danielle
FOSTER-HYLTON Brigitte Ann
GEORGE Phylicia
HOLDER Nikkita
LEWIS Yvette
PEARSON Sally
WELLS Kellie
ZAGRE Anne

Womens High Jump
AITOVA Marina
CHICHEROVA Anna
DI MARTINO Antonietta
ILJUŠTŠENKO Anna
JUNGMARK Ebba
MELFORT Melanie
OKUNEVA Oksana
RADZIVIL Svetlana
SHKOLINA Svetlana
SLESARENKO Yelena
VLAŠIĆ Blanka

Womens Triple Jump
ALDAMA Yamilé
GAY Mabel
KUROPATKINA Anna
LA MANTIA Simona
RYPAKOVA Olga
SALADUKHA Olha
TRYBAŃSKA Małgorzata
VELĎÁKOVÁ Dana

Womens Discus
BARRIOS Yarelis
BROWN-TRAFTON Stephanie
GLANC Żaneta
KARSAK Kateryna
LI Yanfeng
MÜLLER Nadine
TAN Jian
THURMOND Aretha D.

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Buoyant Rudisha seeks Kipketer’s tough record in Brussels - Samsung Diamond League

Mike Rowbottom for the Samsung Diamond League
IAAF Website
Thursday, 15 September 2011


Brussels, Belgium - Even though he had missed beating his World 800m record by just over three tenths of a second five days earlier, David Rudisha looked a calm and contented man here today at an official press conference ahead of Friday’s Belgacom Memorial Van Damme – Samsung Diamond League meeting (16).

There is no disguising the pleasure and relief Rudisha feels about his achievement at the IAAF World Championships in Daegu (27 Aug to 4 Sep), where he confirmed he was a racer as well as a World record holder by winning the 800 metres gold with complete assurance.

Although he is already beginning to address the pressure he will be under to deliver again at the London 2012 Olympics, this thoughtful and quietly spoken 22-year-old who leads the season long 800m Diamond Race looked very buoyant on the eve of the concluding 2011 Samsung Diamond League meeting here as he looked forward to his latest challenge – that of breaking the 14-year-old stadium record in the Belgacom Memorial Van Damme.

That record stands to Rudisha’s predecessor as World record holder, Wilson Kepketer, who ran 1:42.20 at the King Badouin stadium in 1997, his record-breaking year.

“It’s a tough stadium record to bring down, but that is my focus if everything goes well and we have good weather,” said Rudisha, who looked on for what would have been a third World record performance in Rieti on Saturday (10) before faltering very slightly to finish in 1:41.33, 0.32 sec off his best time.

With regard to the latter factor, meeting promoter Wilfried Meert, sitting alongside the tall Kenyan, was quick to add that the weather forecast was promising.

Reflecting on his success in Daegu, Rudisha made it clear that he had been under considerable duress given his failure to manage better than fifth place in the 2009 World Championship final in Berlin, where his warm-up was disrupted by heavy rain.

“It was really a disappointment I had in 2009 in Berlin,” he said. “So I had a lot of pressure coming into 2010 and this last year. After breaking the World record without any title it was really tough for me. All my focus was just on winning this title. There was a lot of expectation from everywhere.”

“I’m happy that at least I handled everything in a good way. I’ve achieved that, and now I feel I feel relieved. Because there were some people beforehand who were starting to say I was not a championship runner. But it’s not like that. Now I have proved I can do it.”

“All this year I have been talking about it, I have been dreaming about it, about how I can do it. So it is something I feel really happy I have done.”

An answer for all racing scenarios
And it was the manner of his achievement – waiting until the last 150 metres before kicking for home ahead of his perennial rival Abubaker Kaki, the double World Indoor champion from Sudan, and the 2004 Olympic champion Yuriy Borzakovskiy – which offered him as much satisfaction as anything else.

“In my final in Daegu I left everything to the last 150 metres,” Rudisha said. “When I looked up at the screen I saw I had already opened the gap, and I still had power to come, more than that.”

“In the first lap I was just cruising. Going to 300 metres, normally I will push there, but I was just trying to keep my energy for the last 150. And that is exactly what I did because I didn’t want to make any mistakes in the final.”

“I knew that I was strong and that I could push for the whole of the last 400. But there was no chance of that because we did two rounds and if I had tried to push too soon maybe in the last 50 metres someone could come. That’s why I kept my effort to the last because the important thing is just to win.”

He agreed that the way he controlled that race has added to his confidence.

“I am very confident running from the front, but the important thing is I am strong,” he said. “I can control the pace, I can push hard, and also I have the speed for the finish, which gives me more confidence, because I can sprint as well even if it is a slow pace.”

London on his mind
It is a frightening prospect indeed for his rivals. But a part of Rudisha’s mind is already preparing for a new and larger challenge.

“It is the end of one thing, and also the beginning of another one,” he said. “I have the world record and I am the World champion. But next year is Olympic year. It is more important for me also to win the Olympics, and I know there will be pressure to go there and get that gold medal.”

“So I think that is another pressure ahead of me. I have never been in the Olympics before. It is going to be my first time there, so I hope it will turn out to be OK. But I don’t think I will have the pressure there I had going into Daegu this year.”

Having watched his most recent race in Rieti, where he set his World record in 2010, Rudisha has identified the significant weakness.

“Everything went as we had planned, but I think I was lacking something in my last 200 metres,” he said. “In my last 100 metres I was completely…I think it was because of the World Championships that I felt a little bit exhausted in the last 200. That’s where I missed the world record. But it was a good race.”

It was indeed, and it underlined the feeling that, sooner rather than later, Rudisha will be the first man to run a sub 1:41sec 800 metres. He, however, remains cautious – just as he was in 2010 before he had set his successive World records.

“It’s really tough to concentrate on two things in the same year,” he said. “This year I was trying to concentrate on the World Championships, and way you run your programme is a little bit different from the way you train for the fast times, because championships are tactical.”

“Last year I was a little bit free, because there was no major championship. So I was training for the fast time. Next year the Olympics are very important and that is what I will focus on. But anything else, if it comes on the way, no problem…”

No thoughts of 1500
Unlike his rival Kaki, who is already considering doubling up over 1500 metres, Rudisha’s thoughts remain with the 800 metres. However, he will consider a minor shift at the end of next season, if all goes according to plan.

“I’m more like a sprinter. I can do the 400/800. But I don’t want to move up at this time because I don’t want anything to affect my training and maybe affect my rhythm in the 800. I don’t want to take any risk.

“I think maybe after the Olympics next year, though, if I have accomplished what I want, I will just try to do something at the end of the year. I want to do maybe one 1000m because I have never done that before. So I want to see how I feel and in the future maybe try 1500.”

It is not meant as a warning – but it sounds like one.

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2011 Diamond Races head for dramatic finish in Brussels Final– PREVIEW – Samsung Diamond League

Mike Rowbottom for the IAAF
IAAF Website
Thursday, 15 September 2011


Brussels, Belgium – The weather forecast is set fair for the second Final of the 2011 Samsung Diamond League which takes place tomorrow night (Friday 16 September) at the Belgacom Memorial Van Damme in Brussels, Belgium, where the remaining Diamond Race Trophies and prize money will be distributed.

Back on 6 May in Doha, Qatar, the world’s finest athletes began their season long quest for the coveted mantle of ‘world’s most consistent performer’ in 32 event disciplines. It was a battle which has been fought out across the 14 meetings of the Samsung Diamond League, the sport’s premier global invitational series of meetings which climax in the Belgian capital.

In total 8 Million US$ in prize money has been at stake during the 2011 series, with the Finals at the last two meetings, Weltklasse Zürich (8 Sep) and tomorrow’s Belgacom Memorial Van Damme, seeing the final distribution of prizes, a spectacular Diamond Race Trophy and US$40,000 in cash to each of the 32 overall event winners. 16 event disciplines were decided last week in Zürich, and the last competitions in the remaining 16 events take place in Brussels.

The Brussels start list is of course heavy with talent but the current Diamond Race leaders are divided into two distinct groups. There are those like David Rudisha, Dai Greene, Carmelita Jeter, Amantle Montsho, Sally Pearson and Olha Saladukha who are high on the oxygen of Daegu triumphs and are ready to that cement success here, and there are those like Walter Dix, Renaud Lavillenie, Phillips Idowu, Dylan Armstrong, Andreas Thorkildsen, and Milcah Chemos who not having reached the top rung in Daegu, are looking to successfully conclude their season’s with a Diamond Race Trophy.

World’s fastest looking to be this season’s fastest
Making his sixth appearance in the Samsung Diamond League this season is the world’s fastest man Usain Bolt who, looking to set the fastest 100m time in the world this year to make-up in some way for his disqualification in Daegu, takes on the short sprint which is not a Diamond Race in Brussels.

"I'm really looking forward to this", said a tired but upbeat Bolt shortly after flying into the Belgian capital. "I really want this world year best and I feel good. I think I have it in me to run the fastest time of the year.”

In order to do that, Bolt – who recovered his fortunes in Daegu by retaining his 200m title in 19.40sec and then ran the anchor leg in a 4x100m World record of 37.04sec – will have to better the time of 9.78sec posted by his Jamaican colleague Asafa Powell in Lausanne at the end of June.

Bolt was only partially satisfied with his performance in Tuesday’s IAAF World Challenge meeting in Zagreb, where he ran his best time of the year so far, 9.85sec.

"Still, I am not entirely happy about that race. I did not feel good at the start, and for a few seconds lost my focus too.”

It will be Bolt’s fourth appearance at the Belgacom Memorial Van Damme meeting, where he has established stadium records for the 100m (9.77# and the 200m #19.57#. His closest rival on the night looks likely to be fellow Jamaican Nesta Carter, who has a timing of 9.90sec this year and ran a personal best of 9.78 last season.


Blake vs Dix vs Ndure - 200m Diamond Race
But back to the Diamond Race, Bolt is not the only Jamaican World champion sprinter with a big task on his hands here. World 100m champion, Yohan Blake, the 19-year-old who profited from his unexpected absence in Daegu, insisted on his arrival here that he wanted to run “a perfect race” over 200 metres in what will be his last competitive outing of the season.

Unless Walter Dix does something drastic like fall over, he looks sure to secure the Diamond Race Trophy for the 200 metres – and its accompanying prize of $40,000 - in what will be the second night of “finals” following last week’s meeting in Zurich.

It would be a nice counterpoint to last season, when injury prevented the American from contesting the final when he looked poised to win overall.

With 12 points, the Daegu double silver medallist is level at the top with Bolt. The only runner with a faint chance of overhauling Dix is Norway’s Jaysuma Saidy Ndure, who has five points.

Dix, however, will not be banking on winning the race on the night given the presence of the man who beat him to the World 100m title last month, Blake, who has twice since run a personal best of 9.82sec, and his 21-year-old Jamaican colleague Nickel Ashmeade, who has a 19.95 clocking to his credit this year.

In the aftermath of a spectacular but draining World Championship in Korea, meeting promoter Wilfried Meert says he has had to replace 25 athletes in the past five days. But he added: “Thankfully, the top four or five in the world in most events are still there.”


Rudisha targets Kipketer’s mark
David Rudisha, who missed setting a third 800m world record by just 0.33sec in Rieti on Saturday, has targeted the stadium record of 1min 42.20sec set in 1997 by his predecessor as world record holder, Wilson Kipketer.

But mere victory will be enough to confirm his successful defence of the Diamond Race trophy. Among those trying to frustrate the World champion’s plans will be his perennial rival Abukaker Kaki, the double World Indoor champion from Sudan, who is four points adrift of him in this year’s Trophy standings on four points, as is Poland’s Marcin Lewandowski.

Rudisha will also come under pressure from two fellow Kenyans in the form of World and Olympic 1500m champion Asbel Kiprop, who has six points, and Alfred Kirwa Yego.


Jeter poised to complete sprint Diamond Race double
With an eight point lead in the 100 metres and a superior record of victories, Carmelita Jeter is unassailable in Diamond Race terms and poised to complete a double in the 100 and 200 metres – which she won in Zurich last week - to match that achieved by fellow American Allyson Felix in the 200 and 400 metres in last year’s inaugural Diamond Race.

But the two women below her in the standings with six points apiece – Veronica Campbell-Brown of Jamaica and Kelly-Anne Baptiste of Trinidad and Tobago, respectively silver and bronze to her gold in Daegu – are likely to provide a big challenge that means Jeter will have to concentrate fully to round off her major season with a victory.

Like Jeter, Dai Greene is also on the brink of closing a World title-winning year with a Diamond Race victory. The Briton has 12 points, and with his nearest challenger, South Africa’s LJ Van Zyl absent, the closest rival in terms of points will be Puerto Rico’s Javier Culson, who Greene overhauled in the closing metres of the Daegu final.

Bershawn Jackson, last year’s Diamond Race winner, is another absentee, but the former Olympic and World champion Felix Sanchez of the Dominican Republic will seek to end his season with a flourish.


Pearson holds one-point lead
Sally Pearson may have been miles ahead of her rivals in the World Championship 100m hurdles competition, but in the Diamond Race the competition is breathing down her neck.

While the Australian has amassed 12 points, Danielle Carruthers of the United States, who ran a personal best of 12.47sec to take silver behind Pearson in Daegu, is only one adrift. One point behind Carruthers is fellow American Kellie Wells, who will want to end her season on a more positive note after the spectacular fall she suffered in the Daegu final.


Milcah Chemos, assured of retaining the 3000m Steeplechase Diamond Race Trophy as she stands 10 points clear of her rivals, is focusing on a World record finale to her season.

Chemos, who has won all six of her races this season, only needs to set off from the start line to ensure she will receive the $40.000 prize. But she has loftier ambitions.

"I hope I can achieve my big goal in Brussels: to break the World record," says the Kenyan who lost what had seemed a certain gold in Daegu. Her personal best is 9:08.57; the World record of 8:58.81 has been held by Gulnara Galkina of Russia since 2008.


Thorkildsen aims to make up for below-par Daegu
With a total of 14 points already in the Javelin Throw, five more than his nearest challenger, Norway’s double Olympic champion Andreas Thorkildsen is in a strong position to retain his Diamond Race title.

But the fact that the second-placed thrower is Matthias De Zordo, who defeated a strangely lacklustre Thorkildsen, one of the strongest pre-Champs favourites, in Daegu to claim gold, will be an intriguing test for the Norwegian. With Olympic year looming, the last big match-up of the season could be an important psychological pointer.


Vlasic has her work cut out
Unlike Thorkildsen, Blanka Vlasic is already sure of retaining her Diamond Race winner’s status in the high jump, where her total of 18 points leaves her 12 clear of Russia’s Anna Chicherova, who won gold ahead of the Croatian’s silver in Daegu on countback. The presence of the effervescent Antoinetta Di Martino, who won a World bronze for Italy last month, will compound the competitiveness of the event.


Saladukha unassailable
In the women’s Triple Jump, the world champion Olha Saladukha will find it a formality to take the Diamond Race as Cuba’s Yargeris Savigne, two points behind her, is out following the thigh injury which undermined her aspirations in Daegu.

Olga Rypakova, the Daegu silver medallist, can’t overtake Saladukha overall, but with a season’s best of 14.96m, just two centimetres behind the Ukraine athlete’s best of the year, she can certainly do so on the night.


Tight Discus duel awaits
The women’s Discus Throw features two main challengers for the Diamond League Race, and happily both are fit to contest the final – Germany’s Nadine Muller, the Daegu silver medallist, has 11 points, one more than Cuba’s Yarelis Barrios, the World bronze medallist.

That said, with eight points up for grabs in the final, either of the US throwers Aretha Thurmond (6pts) or Olympic champion Stephanie Brown-Trafton (5) could advance dramatically, as could China’s World champion Yanfeng Li, who has four points. All to throw for!


Race already secure for Armstrong
Dylan Armstrong’s outstanding consistency this season has already earned him the Diamond Race title. The Canadian, who took silver in Daegu, is nine points clear of his nearest challenger, Reese Hoffa, who is in turn one point ahead of fellow American Christian Cantwell.

Armstrong will be seeking to end his season with a flourish, however, after the shock of being beaten in Daegu by David Storl of Germany’s last round personal best of 21.78. Storl does not compete here.


Lavillenie vs Mohr
Malte Mohr is the only man who can prevent Renaud Lavillenie from securing a second successive Diamond Race trophy in the Pole Vault.

The Frenchman took bronze in Daegu with 5.85 behind the surprise packages of Lazaro Borges, who set a Cuban record of 5.90, and Poland’s Pawel Wojciechowski (currently injured), who also managed 5.90 and took gold on count-back.

In Brussels, however, his main challenge will come from the German who stands six points behind him on points with a total of 10.


Jamal looking for a happy ending
After the huge disappointment of Daegu, where her quest to win a third consecutive 1500m title ended with her finishing a distant last in the final, Bahrain’s Maryam Yusuf Jamal has the chance to end her season with a happier memory.

And if she can beat her US rival Morgan Uceny, two points ahead of her at the top of the Diamond Race standings with 11 points, Jamal can also conclude with the comforting addition of $40,000 and a first Diamond Race trophy.

The race will be close and competitive given the additional presence of Kenya’s Janeth Jepkosgei, Diamond Race winner over 800m last year, Jamal’s Bahrain colleague Mimi Belete, and Spain’s Natalia Rodriguez, who partially made up for having her 2009 World gold taken away for elbowing by earning bronze in the Daegu final.


Idowu faces Cuban challenge
Britain’s Phillips Idowu is certain to wrest the distinction of being the Diamond Race winner in the Triple Jump away from his young French rival Teddy Tamgho, whose season ended early because of a stress fracture.

Alexis Copello of Cuba, 11 points adrift of the Daegu silver medallist on seven points, looks likely to prove Idowu’s strongest opposition on the night, although Sheryf El Sheryf of Ukraine, with a season’s best of 17.72 that is just five centimetres less than the Briton’s, will also be a jumper to reckon with, as will be the lone American, Will Clay, who has achieved 17.50 this season.


Montsho has had a supreme season
Amantle Montsho, who won one of the outstanding races of the World Championships as she edged over the line just ahead of Allyson Felix to take the 400m gold, has a less challenging task ahead of her given her unreachable total of 20 points.

But while the champion from Botswana will doubtless be seeking to end her year in fitting fashion, the race promises to be close given the presence of Novlene Williams-Mills of Jamaica and Britain’s Olympic champion Christine Ohuruogu, who can leave herself with a better feeling about the season following her false start in the World Championship heats.

Merga to make up for Farah’s absence
Despite Meert’s insistence that he had tried “very hard” to secure the presence of the runner who leads the 5000m Diamond Race, Mo Farah, Britain’s World champion has chosen to compete in the UK this weekend.

That said, Farah’s lead was only one point, and now the man just behind him in the standings, Imane Merga of Ethiopia, stands to collect another $40,000 following his success last year. He will face strong opposition, however, from his fellow countryman Dejen Gebremeskel, who is only three points adrift of him on a score of four.

Mathematically, in fact, the Diamond Race could be won by others in the field if Merga and Gebremeskel have a bad outing.


Bekele returns after Daegu ‘Did not finish’
There are a number of non-Diamond Race competitions tomorrow night.

Olympic 10,000m champion Kenenisa Bekele, who returned after a two-year injury absence to defend his World title in Daegu only to drop out shortly before the halfway mark, will run here against a field in which 12 of his 15 opponents will be Kenyans, including former world champion Eliud Kipchoge.

Oscar Pistorius, who became the first amputee to compete in an able-bodied World Championships last month, reaching the 400m semi-finals, will race over that distance in a race which, as with the 10,000m, is not part of the Diamond League programme. Among his opponents will be the home pairing of Kevin and Jonathan Borlee.

And finally, the meeting offers a world first in the form of an unofficial 400 metres race which will be run the opposite way around the track.

The “reverse 400” was suggested by Professor Dirk Huylebrouck. Along with one of his students, the athlete Nils Duerinck, he is intrigued by the fact that track races are always run counter-clockwise. And so an effort will be made to discover if it helps athletes run faster or slower.

What will be made of the conclusion is anybody’s guess…


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